121 stories
·
1 follower

U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings dies; longtime Baltimore advocate was key figure in Trump impeachment inquiry

1 Comment and 2 Shares
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
rlauzon
4 days ago
reply
Good riddance to bad rubbish.

Trump Prepares to Pack the Fed with Economic Imbeciles

1 Comment
The president has tapped conservative pundit Stephen Moore to serve on the bank’s board, and is reportedly considering Herman Cain for a second slot.
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
rlauzon
212 days ago
reply
What?! He's doing to put Democrats in the Fed? You're right. That's a really bad idea.

Republicans Already Are Demonizing Democrats as Socialists and Baby Killers

2 Comments
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
2 public comments
rlauzon
245 days ago
reply
Ummmm... The Democrats have admitted that they are socialists and baby killers. There's no "demonization".
acdha
245 days ago
reply
Wherein the NYT wakes up from a three decade coma…
Washington, DC

tubaterry: I guess woke consumerism has a silver lining? This is why you won’t catch me criticizing...

2 Comments and 3 Shares

tubaterry:

I guess woke consumerism has a silver lining?

This is why you won’t catch me criticizing Company X for pandering to the left or being fake-woke or virtue signalling. The important takeaway is not that they are All Woke and Liberal now…it’s that the right-wing market is no longer significant enough that pissing them off is a risk.

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
2 public comments
rlauzon
249 days ago
reply
Tell that to CNN, Huffington Post, etc. that are in financial difficulties because they pissed off the right-wing majority.
duerig
249 days ago
(a) All media companies are struggling whether they are left, right, non-political, large, or small. This has nothing to do with politics and everything to do with the fact that advertising is becoming a more and more difficult way of providing sustainable profits for companies that produce abstract goods. (b) There is nothing that CNN or any other non-right-wing news company can do to prevent pissing off those in the right-wing. Most of those in the right-wing spotlight have a vested interest in telling their listeners about how evil and untrustworthy news companies to their left are. (c) There is no such thing as a 'right-wing majority'. Neither political party has the passionate support of a majority of the population. Most people don't vote and thus are unlikely to be fervent supporters of either side. Of those that do vote, around half vote for either side. This is why presidential elections are almost always close in the popular vote. Whatever your political predilections, most of the population is indifferent to your goals and you only stand with 15-20% of the population.
rlauzon
249 days ago
(a) Media companies make money by having eyeballs. Since they have started being political, no one trusts them, so no one watches them. (b) Yes, there is plenty they can do: stop lying and start reporting the facts instead of their (usually) left-wing slant. (c) Need I remind you who is president.
duerig
249 days ago
(a) Media companies make money by selling advertising. I haven't read indications that eyeballs have decreased. Rather, overall advertising income has stayed about constant but Google and Facebook are taking increasing shares of it while all media companies as a whole have seen a decreasing share. (b) Even if 'mainstream' media becomes more right-wing, it is unclear why people who currently watch right-wing media would switch. Outback Steakhouse could focus on making tastier veggie platters, but are they really going to convert the vegan crowd? No. (c) Our elections do not require the president to have the passionate support of a majority of the population. Which is good, because presidents rarely enjoy that level of support. The current president lost the popular vote. And only a little over half the voting-age population voted: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voter_turnout_in_the_United_States_presidential_elections So the current president was elected based on the support of less than 30% of the population. And that is 'picking a name on a screen' support and not 'willing to boycott and change my lifestyle to further my idealogical goals' commitment. I should note that this particular point is not specific to Trump. Even though Obama won the popular vote both times, his support was still only around 30%. Bush before him was the same. Clinton before him was the same. To get better than that, you might have to go back to Reagan/Mondale and even then you'd have to run the numbers. So the reality is that right-wing people prefer right-wing media. Left-wing people prefer left-wing media. Centrist people prefer centrist media. And all these medias are struggling over a shrinking pot of advertising dollars. Nothing the left-wing or mainstream media do will make them significantly more watched by people who are not already in their audience. Why would a Hannity-lover skip Hannity for CNN even if they heard CNN was less liberal than it used to be?
darastar
257 days ago
reply
I have never thought about it this way. Interesting...

670 ballots in a precinct with 276 voters, and other tales from Georgia's primary

1 Comment and 2 Shares
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/670-ballots-in-a-precinct-with-276-voters-and-other-tales-from-georgias-primary/ar-BBLBUA4

WASHINGTON - Habersham County's Mud Creek precinct in northeastern Georgia
had 276 registered voters ahead of the state's primary elections in May.

But 670 ballots were cast, according to the Georgia secretary of state's
office, indicating a 243 percent turnout.  Georgia is one of four states
that uses voting machines statewide that produce no paper record for voters
to verify, making them difficult to audit, experts say.

  Difficult indeed. Coincidentally (we hope), 83% of the county vote was for
  the outgoing secretary of state Kemp.

  It really only takes one story like this to prove the larger proposition
  that unauditable electronic voting machines are a menace to
  democracy. Only obvious errors like this bubble to the surface; who knows
  what goes on in other cases?
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
rlauzon
301 days ago
reply
Are the Democrats STILL sticking to their narrative that there's been no evidence of voter fraud?

GoDaddy bans Gab

1 Share
Add GoDaddy to the list of corporations deplatforming Gab:
Gab, the far-right social network that the suspect in Saturday’s mass shooting at Pittsburgh synagogue used to share anti-Semitic posts, has gone offline after GoDaddy gave it 24 hours to find a new domain provider. GoDaddy’s decision comes after PayPal, Medium, Stripe, and Joyent banned Gab’s accounts over the weekend.
I'm not going to pretend that I don't find this extremely amusing, or that I did not anticipate this result when Andrew Torba refused to remove libel, pornography, and fake rape photoshops from his site at my request. As I said more than a year ago, Torba lacks the temperament and the detachment required to run a company, particularly in testing times such as these. But the Gab deplatforming is merely a minor symptom of the real problem, which has been decades in the making.

As I mentioned in the Darkstream last night, what these corporations are doing is literally destroying the basis for a developed economy. And not only what they are doing now, but what they have been in the process of doing for the past 15 years. The EULAs, the Terms of Service, and the selling of software of a service, and the SJW convergence have all collectively routed around the rule of law which is necessary for sustained economic growth over time.
In countries with strong rule of law:

1. Property rights over land, equipment, and personal items are clear and protected by law.
3. Contracts between people, businesses, and the government are effectively enforced by the legal system.
3. Political accountability is high and corruption is low.
4. Business regulations are clear and enforced in a transparent manner.

In such environments people make long-term investments and build large organizations. In contrast, if the property rights and contracts are not enforced and the business regulations are not clear, most of the economy consists of small family owned firms with little modern equipment. A high-tech, prosperous economy would not develop.
Effectively, there are no contracts anymore in the digital economy. There is no predictability anymore. There is no accountability. There is no responsibility. There are no requirements for performance anymore. In sum, the US digital economy is rapidly becoming the equivalent of a third-world economy, complete with crony capitalism and digital robber barons.
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories